Luso-Chinese Agreement

The Luso-Chinese Agreement: A Brief Overview

In 1999, the Luso-Chinese Agreement was signed, marking an important moment in the relationship between Portugal and China. The agreement, which is officially known as the Joint Declaration of the Government of the People`s Republic of China and the Government of the Portuguese Republic on the Question of Macao, outlined the terms of the transfer of Macao from Portugal to China.

Macao had been a Portuguese colony for over 400 years, and the transfer of sovereignty was a complex process that required extensive negotiations between the two governments. The Luso-Chinese Agreement, which was signed on April 13, 1987, provided a framework for the transfer of power and established the basic principles that would govern the administration of Macao after the transfer.

Under the terms of the agreement, Macao would retain a high degree of autonomy under the “one country, two systems” principle, similar to the arrangement that was established for Hong Kong when it was returned to China from British control in 1997. This meant that Macao would retain its own legal system, currency, and way of life, while still being part of the People`s Republic of China.

The Luso-Chinese Agreement also provided for the protection of the rights and interests of the people of Macao, including the right to freedom of speech, the press, and assembly, as well as the right to participate in the management of public affairs.

The transfer of Macao took place on December 20, 1999, and since then, the region has flourished as a special administrative region of China. Macao is now a major center for tourism and gambling, with a vibrant economy and a rich cultural heritage.

In conclusion, the Luso-Chinese Agreement marked an important moment in the history of Macao, Portugal, and China. The agreement provided a framework for the transfer of power that ensured a smooth transition and protected the rights and interests of the people of Macao. Today, Macao is a thriving city that serves as a bridge between China and the West, and the Luso-Chinese Agreement remains an important symbol of the strong relationship between Portugal and China.